660 Conduct

661 Statutory Provisions

661.1 Laws Referenced in This Manual

The laws mentioned in this manual are listed for information only. Nothing in this manual constitutes an interpretation or construction of these laws which might be construed as binding the United States Postal Service or the United States.

Failure to mention a statute does not excuse any person from complying with the statute.

661.2 Application to Postal Employees

In addition to the statutes listed in Title 5, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 2635.901–902, the following statutes and regulations are applicable to all employees in the Postal Service.

  1. Prohibition against proscribed political activities (Title 5, United States Code (U.S.C.), subchapter III of chapter 73, and 18 U.S.C. 602, 603, 607, and 608).
  2. Prohibition against appointing or promoting a relative, or advocating such an appointment or promotion (5 U.S.C. 3110).
  3. Prohibition against disloyalty and striking (5 U.S.C. 7311; 18 U.S.C. 1918).
  4. Prohibition against bribery, graft, and conflicts of interest (18 U.S.C. 201, 203, 205, 208, and 209).
  5. Prohibition against acting as the agent for a foreign principal registered under the Foreign Agents Registration Act (18 U.S.C. 219).
  6. Prohibition against unauthorized taking or use of documents relating to claims against or by the government (18 U.S.C. 285).
  7. Prohibition against postal employees becoming interested in any contract for carrying the mail (18 U.S.C. 440).
  8. Prohibition against counterfeiting and forging transportation requests (18 U.S.C. 508).
  9. Prohibition against deprivation of employment or other benefit for political activity (18 U.S.C. 601).
  10. Prohibition against:
    1. Embezzlement of government money or property (18 U.S.C. 641).
    2. Failing to account for public money (18 U.S.C. 643).
    3. Embezzlement of money or property of another person in the possession of an employee by reason of his or her employment (18 U.S.C. 641).
  11. Prohibition against:
    1. Disclosure of classified information (18 U.S.C. 798).
    2. Disclosure of confidential information (18 U.S.C. 1905).
  12. Prohibition against fraud or false statements in a government matter (18 U.S.C. 1001).
  13. Prohibition against participation in lottery enterprises (18 U.S.C. 1303).
  14. Prohibition against carriage of mail contrary to law (18 U.S.C. 1693).
  15. Prohibition against desertion of mail (18 U.S.C. 1700).
  16. Prohibition against obstruction of correspondence (18 U.S.C. 1702).
  17. Prohibition against delay or destruction of mail or newspapers (18 U.S.C. 1703).
  18. Prohibition against theft of property (18 U.S.C. 1707).
  19. Prohibition against theft of mail (18 U.S.C. 1709).
  20. Prohibition against theft of newspapers (18 U.S.C. 1710).
  21. Prohibition against misappropriation of Postal Service funds (18 U.S.C. 1711).
  22. Prohibition against falsification of postal returns (18 U.S.C. 1712).
  23. Prohibition against improper issuance of money orders (18 U.S.C. 1713).
  24. Prohibition against misuse of the franking privilege (18 U.S.C. 1719).
  25. Prohibition against the unlawful sale or pledge of stamps (18 U.S.C. 1721).
  26. Prohibition against unlawful collection of postage (18 U.S.C. 1726).
  27. Prohibition against improper approval of bond or sureties (18 U.S.C. 1732).
  28. Prohibition against lobbying with appropriated funds (18 U.S.C. 1913).
  29. Prohibition against the use of deceit in an examination or personnel action in connection with government employment (18 U.S.C. 1917).
  30. Prohibition against mutilating or destroying a public record (18 U.S.C. 2071).
  31. Prohibition against disclosure of lists of names and addresses (39 U.S.C. 412).
  32. Prohibition against making or receiving political recommendations for appointment or promotion (39 U.S.C. 1002).
  33. Prohibition against receipt of unauthorized fees (39 U.S.C. 1009).
  34. rohibition against opening First–Class Mail® (39 U.S.C. 3623).
  35. Oath of office required for all postal employees (39 U.S.C. 1011).
  36. Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a).