Tom Samra

Vice President, Facilities

November 2013



Tom Samra was named vice president of Facilities in November 2005. Samra reports to the chief operating officer and executive vice president and is responsible for all aspects of managing one of the largest civilian facility inventories in the U.S. He heads the department responsible for all Postal Service properties, including 8,900 federally owned and 23,800 leased facilities containing 278 million interior square feet. He oversees the planning, leasing, purchase/sale, design and construction, repair and alteration and redevelopment of facilities that contain postal operations, as well as the day-to-day operating and administrative support for USPS Headquarters facilities.

Samra joined the Postal Service with 31 years of project development and facilities management both domestically and internationally. His most recent assignment was with the American Red Cross, where he served as vice president of Real Estate Development and Material Management. In this capacity, he oversaw execution of the organization’s $200 million strategic real estate plan, including the construction of a new headquarters building and the renovation of three historic buildings.

Additionally, he managed the American Red Cross’ biomedical upgrading program throughout the U.S. This program supports the collection and processing of 65 percent of the nation’s blood supply and required building 22 new facilities and renovating 80 existing ones.

Earlier, Samra served as United Parcel Service’s regional engineering manager in London, England, where he was responsible for opening offices in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. As project manager for the organization in Pine Brook, New Jersey, and Dallas, Samra was responsible for all aspects of development and construction of distribution facilities in three U.S. states and four Canadian provinces.

Born in Lebanon, Samra came to the U.S. to pursue studies in engineering. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from the Detroit Institute of Technology in 1975.