Ethics

Public service is a public trust.

Commitment to Ethics

The Postal Service is committed to maintaining its reputation as the most trusted government entity through principled decision-making and strong ethical values. All postal employees are required to place loyalty to the Constitution, the laws, and ethical principles above private gain. Section 662.1 of the Postal Service's Employee Labor and Relations Manual states as follows:

To ensure that every citizen can have complete confidence in the integrity of the federal government, each federal employee, including each postal employee, must respect and adhere to the principles of ethical conduct set forth in 5 C.F.R. § 2635 [the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch; see also Overview of Standards], 5 C.F.R. § 7001 [the Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the United States Postal Service], and 39 C.F.R. § 447 [the Rules of Conduct for Postal Employees].

The Ethics and Legal Compliance team answers ethics questions about financial conflicts of interest, impartiality, misuse of position, misuse of time, and misuse of property, anti-nepotism, community service activities, gifts from customers, gifts between employees, post-employment ethics restrictions, charitable fundraising, supplemental employment, sales activity, and political activity. If an ethics question arises, please call the Postal Service’s ethics helpline at 202-268-6346 or send an email to ethics.help@usps.gov.

Customer Service or Mail Delivery Issues: Call 1-800-ASK-USPS® (800-275-8777)

Misconduct by a Postal Service Employee: Call 1-888-877-7644

Mail Fraud: Call 1-800-372-8347

Senior Financial Managers’ Code of Ethics

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) was enacted to improve corporate governance and to enhance the accuracy of financial reporting. The Senior Financial Managers’ Code of Ethics affirms our commitment to full and accurate financial reporting.